Lincoln’s Negro Policy

Contrary to popular belief, Abraham Lincoln—and many other famous American politicians and Founding Fathers—regarded total physical racial separation and the repatriation of all blacks back to Africa as the only solution to America’s racial problems.

This work shows—from Lincoln’s speeches and actions—that he never considered the integration of blacks into American society as an option, and repeatedly told “free Negroes” that their true destiny lay outside of America, in a “colony” of their own, either in Africa or elsewhere in the Caribbean or South America.

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Contrary to popular belief, Abraham Lincoln—and many other famous American politicians and Founding Fathers—regarded total physical racial separation and the repatriation of all blacks back to Africa as the only solution to America’s racial problems.

This work shows—from Lincoln’s speeches and actions—that he never considered the integration of blacks into American society as an option, and repeatedly told “free Negroes” that their true destiny lay outside of America, in a “colony” of their own, either in Africa or elsewhere in the Caribbean or South America.

Even Lincoln’s Emancipation Proclamation contained the demand that blacks be sent back to a colony outside the U.S., as this study shows.

This repatriation plan was also supported by millions of blacks. The black organizations and leadership—including Paul Cuffe, Henry M. Turner, Marcus Garvey, and M. M. L. Gordon—are also reviewed in this riveting work.

Lincoln was in fact making plans to establish a colony in Africa for blacks only days before he was assassinated.

This book also studies the work of the American Colonization Society, set up to promote the repatriation policy, and whose members included numerous American presidents such as James Monroe, James Madison, and Abraham Lincoln.

This edition has been completely reset and hand-edited. It contains 11 illustrations and is fully indexed.

About the author: Earnest Sevier Cox (January 24, 1880–April 26, 1966) was a US Army Lieutenant Colonel and World War I veteran who was also one of the most influential writers on race in America right up until his death. In 1922 Cox and composer John Powell founded the Anglo-Saxon Clubs of America in Richmond, Virginia. They were successful in passing Virginia’s Racial Integrity Act of 1924 outlawing miscegenation. The law was only overturned by the United States Supreme Court in 1967.

44 pages.

Additional information

Weight 0.12 kg
Dimensions 6 x 9 in